Contracting Opportunities

 

Artist's rendering of a walkable neighborhoodThank you for your interest in doing business with Better Housing Coalition (BHC). BHC is committed to providing contracting opportunities that may provide employment and training for residents in the neighborhoods we build in. See below for current contract opportunities.

State and Federal funding sources often trigger Section 3 compliance requirements. While not every contractor needs to be Section 3-certified themselves, you must be willing to make best efforts to work with us to make opportunities available to qualified businesses and individuals. Read below for more information about Section 3, and how to take advantage of current opportunities.


Current Opportunities:

Multi-Family Development Opportunities

Winchester Forest Apartments, North Chesterfield: Better Housing Coalition (BHC) invites qualified General Contractors to submit a bid for the new construction of 72 apartments in four buildings in Chesterfield County, in accordance with the bidding documents (available via the link below). This is a HUD-funded project. Section 3 businesses and/or businesses that employ Section 3 residents are encouraged to respond.

Important Deadlines:
Intent to Bid Forms must be submitted by 5:00 pm on January 14, 2021. Contractors should submit response documents no later than 5:00 pm on January 29, 2021.  Response documents received after this closing time will not be accepted.

Questions? Email Lee Alford or Maria Tabacchi.

Click Here for Details, Plans and Important Bid Documents

(Note: Due to large file sizes, the bidding documents have been uploaded to a Google Drive. All documents are downloadable.)


Temporary employment opportunity: BHC is seeking Section 3 eligible and/or certified construction professionals or trainees for full-time and part-time opportunities. (No previous experience needed)

Contractors and Subcontractors: BHC is looking for Section 3 eligible/and or certified construction and trade businesses.

Resources and Application Forms:

Questions?

Email BHC Development Associate Maria Tabacchi or call (804) 644-0546 x135.


Section 3 Q&A

  1. What is Section 3?
  2. How does Section 3 promote homeownership?
  3. Who are Section 3 residents?
  4. What is a Section 3 business concern?
  5. How can businesses find Section 3 residents to work for them?
  6. Are recipients, contractors and subcontractors required to provide long-term employment opportunities, not simply seasonal or temporary employment?
  7. What if it appears an entity is not complying with Section 3?
  8. Will HUD require compliance?
  9. How can Section 3 residents or Section 3 business concerns allege Section 3 violations?

1. What is Section 3?

Section 3 is a provision of the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Act of 1968 that helps foster local economic development, neighborhood economic improvement, and individual self-sufficiency. The Section 3 program requires that recipients of certain HUD financial assistance, to the greatest extent feasible, provide job training, employment, and contracting opportunities for low- or very-low income residents in connection with projects and activities in their neighborhoods.

2. How does Section 3 promote homeownership?

Section 3 is a starting point to homeownership. Once a Section 3 resident has obtained employment or contracting opportunities they have begun the first step to self-sufficiency.

3. Who are Section 3 residents?

Section 3 residents are:

  • Public housing residents or who live in the area where a HUD-assisted project is located, or
  • Persons who have a household income that falls within HUD’s income limits.

Determining Income Levels

  • Low income is defined as 80% or below the median income of that area.
  • Very low income is defined as 50% or below the median income of that area.

4. What is a Section 3 business concern?

A business that:

  • Is 51 percent or more owned by Section 3 residents;
  • Employs Section 3 residents for at least 30 percent of its full-time, permanent staff; or
  • Provides evidence of a commitment to subcontract to Section 3 business concerns, 25 percent or more of the dollar amount of the awarded contract.

5. How can businesses find Section 3 residents to work for them?

Businesses can recruit Section 3 residents in public housing developments and in the neighborhoods where the HUD assistance is being spent. Effective ways of informing residents about available training and job opportunities are:

  • Contacting resident organizations, local community development and employment agencies
  • Distributing flyers
  • Posting signs
  • Placing ads in local newspapers

6. Are recipients, contractors, and subcontractors required to provide long-term employment opportunities, not simply seasonal or temporary employment?

Recipients are required, to the greatest extent feasible, to provide all types of employment opportunities to low and very low-income persons, including permanent employment and long-term jobs.

Recipients and contractors are encouraged to have Section 3 residents make up at least 30 percent of their permanent, full-time staff.

A Section 3 resident who has been employed for 3 years may no longer be counted towards meeting the 30 percent requirement. This encourages recipients to continue hiring Section 3 residents when employment opportunities are available.

7. What if it appears an entity is not complying with Section 3?

There is a complaint process. Section 3 residents, businesses, or a representative for either may file a complaint if it seems a recipient is violating Section 3 requirements are being on a HUD-funded project.

8. Will HUD require compliance?

Yes. HUD monitors the performance of contractors, reviews annual reports from recipients, and investigates complaints. HUD also examines employment and contract records for evidence that recipients are training and employing Section 3 residents and awarding contracts to Section 3 businesses.

9. How can Section 3 residents or Section 3 business concerns allege Section 3 violations?

You can file a written complaint with your local HUD Field Office.

A written complaint should contain:

  • Name and address of the person filing the complaint
  • Name and address of subject of complaint (HUD recipient, contractor or subcontractor)
  • Description of acts or omissions in alleged violation of Section 3
  • Statement of corrective action sought i.e. training, employment or contracts